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How about these Blizzard Quattros for me?
8 posts from 6 users
Updated 13 days ago
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28 days ago

https://www.sierra.com/blizzard-2017and2018-quattro-72ti-alpine-skis-with-xcell-12-bindings~p~567gc/?merch=prod-sim-prod567GC

These are even cheaper than those Fischers I was asking about.  Better?

 

About me from my other post asking about the Fischers:

“I’ve only used rentals and am looking to buy my first pair of skis .  I’m 6’2”, 190, 51 years old, can ski blacks in good conditions but am mostly on blues.  I’m mainly on groomers and don’t care about glades, moguls or terrain parks.  Sure, I’ll go into off-piste powder when available but it’s just not available much around where I ski.  If I go out West I’m content to rent wider powder skis.   My style has been more cautious but I’m looking to ski more aggressively and develop better technique.  I’d like to think I can carve OK on blues but my form breaks down on blacks and certainly on ice.  I have my own boots.  I should mention that I have done most of my skiing at Beech, Sugar, Winterplace and Wintergreen but bought the Ridiculus Pass and am looking to instead go to Snowshoe more next season.  This year we also did Gore in NY and go up to eastern Ontario every other year to see relatives for Christmas so maybe it will be an Ikon Pass and Tremblant in the season after next.  These skis look like a really good deal and well-suited to my skill level and the conditions we often face in this part of the Ice Coast.  Any thoughts on them?”

 

Denis - DCSki Supporter
28 days ago

At some point you just go with something.  Ski it for a couple of years and learn.  Take occasional lessons, enjoy the process. Then you’ll end in a much more informed position for your next ski purchase.  Once you have your own equipment, you can take advantage of free demo days at resorts.  You must leave your current gear and a credit card at the van as ransom, i.e. you need your own equipment to take advantage of free demo days.  Free Demo at every opportunity.  You’ll learn a lot about the characteristics of different ski manufacturers and their lines.  Year to year changes take place slowly, so you are pretty safe buying next year’s edition of a model you have liked, or an earlier edition at half price.  Try different lengths widths, and types, carver, all-mountain, powder, etc.

27 days ago

I can highly recommend the Elan Amphibio XTis.  I have them in the 88s and they rock.  Nice and stiff, and damp at speed.  They really shine at moderate and higher speeds and can hold an edge like crazy.  They performed very well at Roundtop.  If you’re looking for something a little softer, take a look at it’s little brother the Ripstick.

If you’re looking for a good shop, I can recommend powder7.com.  They’re a Colorado shop, and they have a great selection of demo and new skis.  If you buy demo skis, they have the exact pair you’ll buy with pics for your inspection.  You can also zoom in and examine the entire ski - tops and bases.  Shipping’s quick.  And if you need advice, you can call and talk to them.

27 days ago

Thanks for the feedback folks.  Indeed, Powder7 looks cool - great to have the actual photos of the skis in question.

13 days ago

superguy wrote:

I can highly recommend the Elan Amphibio XTis.  I have them in the 88s and they rock.  Nice and stiff, and damp at speed.  They really shine at moderate and higher speeds and can hold an edge like crazy.  They performed very well at Roundtop.  If you’re looking for something a little softer, take a look at it’s little brother the Ripstick.

If you’re looking for a good shop, I can recommend powder7.com.  They’re a Colorado shop, and they have a great selection of demo and new skis.  If you buy demo skis, they have the exact pair you’ll buy with pics for your inspection.  You can also zoom in and examine the entire ski - tops and bases.  Shipping’s quick.  And if you need advice, you can call and talk to them.

Powder7 is a great website, especially for used demo deals. I was so impressed with my dealings with them that I visited their shop the next time I was in Denver. They are mostly online store with just a small but very friendly retail storefront, their warehouse was impresive.

I would suggest from your description that you’d be better off staying under the 85mm underfoot width for frontside groomer skiing, despite the industry trent to make everything wider underfoot. +85 is more geared towards more agressive or softer snow conditions skiing. If you’re looking to really hold an edge on icy mid-atlantic groomers, something like a carving ski in the 70s might be more confidence and inspiring to you.

13 days ago

I’d vote for the Blizzard’s over the Fishers. Fishers were nice, but these are straight up frontside east coast groomed (icy maybe :-P run carvers.

167 length if you you like to make lots of turns and like to keep the speed moderate, 174 if you want to go faster or hit higher speeds more often.

13 days ago
I just skied the Elan Ripsticks on my winter park trip. They are indeed on the softer side. Even at 96 mm really good at holding an edge on the groomers. Pretty good in powder, ok in the moguls, not so great in the crud. All in all a decent all mountain ski but a bit too soft for my liking.
13 days ago

I demo’d the Ripsticks and I could not get used to their lack of heft. While carbon fiber is supposed to be a strong as steel, it does not behave the same as a ski with a layer of titanol. They felt like stiff plastic.

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