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Ski Boot Horn - anybody use this?
13 posts from 8 users
Updated 19 days ago
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22 days ago

I used to use a race bib made of a tear proof paper fabric like Tyvek paper works good foot slides right in and paper pulled out easy,

remember the silicon spray  for the old Hanson ski boots, they make stuff like that for ski boots these days but the Tyvek is better and easier to carry 

marzNC - DCSki Supporter
22 days ago

Vermont wrote:

I used to use a race bib made of a tear proof paper fabric like Tyvek paper works good foot slides right in and paper pulled out easy,

remember the silicon spray  for the old Hanson ski boots, they make stuff like that for ski boots these days but the Tyvek is better and easier to carry 

Recently read of a similar idea but using a plastic trash bag.  Tyvek sounds better.

marzNC - DCSki Supporter
22 days ago

Vermont wrote:

I used to use a race bib made of a tear proof paper fabric like Tyvek paper works good foot slides right in and paper pulled out easy,

remember the silicon spray  for the old Hanson ski boots, they make stuff like that for ski boots these days but the Tyvek is better and easier to carry 

Recently read of a similar idea but using a plastic trash bag for inserting a liner.  Tyvek sounds better.

JimK - DCSki Columnist
22 days ago

The Colonel has two.  He let me try one earlier this week.  It’s fine.  It works like a regular shoehorn, but my boots go on pretty well without the need for one.

22 days ago

I actually have three ski boot horns and always keep one in my ski bag.  As I have aged (will be 79 in a month plus) I have experienced stiff and sometimes sore hip joints which limit my reach toward my shoes/boots, especially when tightening the ski boots.  To help with this problem I also bought a heated boot bag that can be plugged in at home overnight prior to going skiing, and plugged into a car power port for 12v heating while driving to the ski area.  This makes the boots more pliable when booting-up, and the ski boot horn even easier to use! I would recommend the boot horn to anybody that struggles to put on their ski boots.

Unfortunately taking off the boots is still a long reach struggle, especially if a buckle gets stuck closed.  On a couple of occasions I have had to swallow my pride and ask a fellow skier/rider or rental shop employee for assistance in removing my boots! 

Full endorsement here for the ski boot horn!

MorganB aka The Colonel 

22 days ago

I actually have three ski boot horns and always keep one in my ski bag.  As I have aged (will be 79 in a month plus) I have experienced stiff and sometimes sore hip joints which limit my reach toward my shoes/boots, especially when tightening the ski boots.  To help with this problem I also bought a heated boot bag that can be plugged in at home overnight prior to going skiing, and plugged into a car power port for 12v heating while driving to the ski area.  This makes the boots more pliable when booting-up, and the ski boot horn even easier to use! I would recommend the boot horn to anybody that struggles to put on their ski boots.

Unfortunately taking off the boots is still a long reach struggle, especially if a buckle gets stuck closed.  On a couple of occasions I have had to swallow my pride and ask a fellow skier/rider or rental shop employee for assistance in removing my boots! 

Full endorsement here for the ski boot horn!

MorganB aka The Colonel 

21 days ago

Thank you Colonel!  I appreciate the first hand knowledge on the boot horn-they looked like no brainers, but never have seen these before.  I have new boots and getting liners in stiff shell is not happening without something like this, so glad to run across them and find it works from your first hand experience.  BTW, I’m pleased to see you skiing and enjoying life so well at almost 79, and wish you many, many more years of skiing!  Heck, if Lou Battori could make 107, maybe you are just getting started.  (He would have been able to call you a “kid” and get away with it you know!  Anyway, I’m 25 yrs your jr, but keep it up, I’m inspired and enjoy your posts.  Appreciate the tip on the heated boot bag, too, may have to look into that as well some day.  I’m surmising that a thank you for your service is in order to you as well.

Denis - DCSki Supporter
21 days ago

I’ve been using this, http://thebootster.com/buy-shoe-horn/ 

which I found in ‘Seniors Skiing’.  It is a great solution to the first part of the boot problem, getting them on.  The second part, getting them off, when they are cold and stiff, is much tougher.  I recently got new boots and have been having a terrible time.  I get bruises which make the next day’s skiing painful.  So I decided to overthink the problem (a personal flaw).  I cut the spindle off the slippy slidy thing so I could leave it in the boot while skiing and it would facilitate taking the boot off.  It didn’t work out that way, it moves around and bunches up as you ski.  So I’m still looking for a part 2 solution.  Maybe Velcro tabs, or maybe I should stop overthinking.  I like snug boots so I downsize them from my 9.5 street shoe to a 26 mondo (8) and use super thin liner socks.  The new boots and bindings are the telemark NTN (new telemark norm) SYSTEM, so if you’re not interested in that, skip the rest of this post. 

I went with the Outlaw-X bindings from 22 Designs.  They are a whole different animal from any other tele binding I’ve ever skied.  Unlike all 75 mm (older design) bindings there is absolutely no torsional slop.  The soles of 75mm boots can twist.  These do not, the binding prevents it, and as a result they ski parallel turns as well as any alpine setup.  As a senior, I like this, and often resort to parallel turns on firm snow and when tired. When you drop a knee with older cable bindings (I used 22 Designs hammerheads and Axls for years), the spring resistance does not engage immediately.  This can be seen when riding in a lift chair behind a telemark skier.  The tail drop of the skis is a dead giveaway.  NTN bindings engage instantly.  There is no tail drop.  The resistance is also much more firm than I am used to.  As a result telemark turns have a completely different feel which I am still trying to dial in; it’s like learning the turn all over again.  Last season, while recovering from 2 knee replacements, I skied alpine and XC only.  

I’d love to hear the impressions  of others who have triedNTN.

19 days ago

I’d imagine the Boot Horn or something similar being great for those who use lace-up liners who don them and then have to get the liner back into the shell. Spray lubricants aren’t kind to many materials, so something to help that slide is welcome. Catching a none-too-cheap liner on sharp edges inside the shell isn’t fun.

Denis - DCSki Supporter
19 days ago

Oh my.  I may have completely missed what we are talking about here.  I NEVER take the liners out of boots.  To do that many times is a sure recipe for gouging, tearing, ruining them, IMHO.  I use a boot dryer religiously after skiing.  Fabreze and a dryer sheet for off season storage.

19 days ago

Actually, Denis, the liners of boots are designed to be removed to dry - and sometimes it’s the only way to get boots completely dry as the liners sometimes trap moisture between the shell and liner, which can create really funky and off-putting smells. If you’ve ever skied in rain, slush, or even deep “cement” powder, the chances of getting liquid intruding into the boot is great. Removing the liner helps expedite drying. And sweating inside boots can also bring the funk. Boot dryers are good, but not always capable of drying the inside of the liner overnight, especially when the liner is still inside the confines of the shell. Remove the liner and there’s more places for mositure to evaporate with ease - it’s win/win.

The liners in racing (and some touring boots) are often equipped with lace-up liners that are intended to be put on without the shell, then slipped into the shell after the liner is laced and tied. These liners can withstand the rigors of repeated insertion and removal from the shell, but not all shells are without sharp surfaces and edges inside. And the soles of the liners are often equipped with a bit of anti-skid material so that when they’re walked in outside of the shell (which racers sometimes do) they won’t slip. This anti-skid coating sometimes gets hung up on the shell, so a Boot Horn or similar device could come in handy for slipping the liner back into the shell.

As a person who wears racing boots with lace-up liners, I’ve become fairly used to inserting and removing my liners on a daily basis. My liners have lasted me 4 seasons now and are almost due for replacement - not due to the wear and tear of taking them in and out of the shell, but from packing out and plain ‘ol use.

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